In-Person Scout: Myles Garrett

In-Person Scout: Myles Garrett

LonghornDigest.com was on hand to scout 2014 defensive end prospect Myles Garrett.

In every recruiting class, there are freaks of nature. You notice them coming off the bus, from 40 yards away, and you wonder just how good they are at football. Then, when they flash or do something spectacular, it takes your breath away. With that lofty introduction, I introduce 2014 Arlington Martin defensive end Myles Garrett.

Garrett is certainly the type of player you notice in warmups, as he may be the state's best-looking prospect. He's every bit of 6-foot-4 and 235 pounds, and with his rangy frame, he looks like he could easily add another 20-30 pounds of good weight to have excellent end size at the next level. Then there's this: he runs extremely well for that size, perhaps even better than Texas commitment Derick Roberson, who weighs 20 pounds less (though Roberson is more fluid).

That speed was evident when Garrett chased down arguably Arlington Bowie's fastest player 40 yards downfield at one point, while he made another play some 20-30 yards downfield later in the game. His speed in pursuit is impressive, as he can really get up and go.

Between that size and speed, and the transitional quickness he showed on an inside twist that allowed him to hit the quarterback, Garrett would seem to be one of the elite few prospects in the state. After all, there is no greater treasure than a player who can wreak havoc on opposing passers … they can change the game.

But the issue is that you don't see it as much as you would like with Garrett. He's just not there on a consistent basis yet, and that's what separates Solomon Thomas as the state's top end (and potentially best overall player) for 2014. When Garrett flashes, he flashes big. He's capable of the highlight play, potentially even moreso than Thomas. And it should be noted that Garrett did spend the game going against Bowie offensive tackle Kristopher Thigpen, one of the state's top line prospects for 2014. But Thigpen is a top-100 type player, whereas Garrett is a top-five talent, and Garrett struggled to produce when facing Thigpen.

None of that is to say that Garrett won't be an outstanding player at the next level. He has the ability, from the size and length to first step and closing speed to be an elite end in the class of 2014, and he rates as one of the top three ends in a strong in-state class with Thomas and Roberson. His place within that group has yet to be determined, but in terms of sheer physical gifts, Garrett might be the greatest of the three.

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